noticeable

noticeable, remarkable, prominent, outstanding, conspicuous, salient, signal, striking, arresting can all mean attracting or compelling notice or attention.
Noticeable implies that the thing so described is unlikely to escape observation
{

a noticeable aversion to his company

}
{

so slight a movement it was barely noticeable—a tiny pushing forward of the hand— Dahi

}
Remarkable adds to noticeable the further implication of inviting comment or of demanding a call to others' attention; it commonly imputes to the thing so described an extraordinary or exceptional character
{

he has a remarkable gift for making friends

}
{

far too much has been written and said about ghosties and ghoulies .... They're remarkable enough, but have you ever realized that things that are remarkable are by definition rare?— Theodore Sturgeon

}
Prominent seldom loses its basic implication of protuberance or projection above a level or beyond a surface; it is applied appropriately to things that noticeably protrude from their back-ground
{

a prominent nose

}
{

feeble gleams . . . served to render sufficiently distinct the more prominent objects around— Poe

}
In extended use it is applied to persons or things that stand out so clearly from their surroundings that they are often in evidence, are generally known or recognized, or are frequently pointed out; in such use it typically attributes superiority or importance to what it describes
{

the church occupies a prominent position in the community

}
{

the second prominent fault in our reading and thinking is that we have not learned to fix our attention discriminatingly— Mott

}
{

with regard to ill fortune . . . fate is given the most prominent part— Linton

}
Outstanding, although it implies prominence, is applicable only to what rises above or beyond others of the same kind and is remarkable by comparison with them
{

stories of outstanding legislators who had to resign simply because they couldn't afford to serve any longer— Armbrister

}
Conspicuous is applicable chiefly to what is so obvious or patent that the eye or the mind cannot miss it
{

conspicuous merit

}
{

conspicuous bravery

}
{

there was also some Yankee shrewdness here, for to be conspicuous— to be a hero—might entail some untoward financial responsibilities— Cheever

}
It is also used to describe what strikes the eye or the mind, often unpleasantly, through its singularity
{

wear conspicuous clothes

}
{

made himself conspicuous by his affectations

}
{

his supporters are conspicuous by their absence

}
{

against spending money for cement sidewalks, which he considered conspicuous waste— E. W. Smith

}
Salient stresses emphatic quality and is applied to what demands the attention or impresses itself insistently upon the mind; it imputes significance more often than obtrusiveness to the thing so described
{

there are days rich in salient news and days far from rich in it— Montague

}
{

pick the salient details out of dull verbiage— Marquand

}
Signal suggests such distinction from what is ordinary or usual that the thing so described is in itself remarkable or memorable
{

a signal mark of esteem

}
{

such an appointment is a signal distinction though its value is mainly honorific— Manoukian

}
{

Emily Dickinson is a signal illustration of this assertion. The imagination of this spinster . . . was constantly aware that the universe surrounded every detail of life— Thornton Wilder

}
Striking is applicable to what impresses itself powerfully and deeply upon the observer's mind or vision
{

one easily remembers the striking scenes in a play

}
{

give a striking example of loyalty

}
{

a woman of striking beauty

}
{

one of the most striking and fearful figures in our early fiction— Parrington

}
Arresting adds to striking the suggestion of capturing attention or of being of more than passing interest
{

an arresting personality

}
{

an arresting story

}
{

the slight, steel-colored figure with steel-colored hair, was more arresting in its immobility than all the vociferations and gestures of the mob— Galsworthy

}
Analogous words: *evident, manifest, obvious, palpable, patent

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • noticeable — [nōt′is ə bəl] adj. 1. readily noticed; conspicuous 2. worth noticing; significant noticeably adv. SYN. NOTICEABLE is applied to that which must inevitably be noticed [a noticeable coolness in his manner ]; REMARKABLE applies to that which is… …   English World dictionary

  • Noticeable — No tice*a*ble, a. Capable of being observed; worthy of notice; likely to attract observation; conspicuous. [1913 Webster] A noticeable man, with large gray eyes. Wordsworth. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • noticeable — index apparent (perceptible), appreciable, blatant (conspicuous), conspicuous, determinable (ascertainable) …   Law dictionary

  • noticeable — (adj.) 1796, worthy of notice, from NOTICE (Cf. notice) (n.) + ABLE (Cf. able). Meaning capable of being noticed is from 1809. Related: Noticeably …   Etymology dictionary

  • noticeable — is spelt with an e in the middle …   Modern English usage

  • noticeable — [adj] conspicuous, evident apparent, appreciable, arresting, arrestive, big as life*, can’t miss it*, clear, distinct, eye catching, manifest, marked, notable, noteworthy, observable, obvious, open and shut*, outstanding, palpable, patent,… …   New thesaurus

  • noticeable — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ easily seen; clear or apparent. DERIVATIVES noticeably adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • noticeable — adjective a fresh coat of paint will make a noticeable difference Syn: distinct, evident, obvious, apparent, manifest, patent, plain, clear, marked, conspicuous, front and center, unmistakable, undeniable, pronounced, prominent, striking,… …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • Noticeable — Wikipedia does not have an encyclopedia article for Noticeable (search results). You may want to read Wiktionary s entry on noticeable instead.wiktionary:Special:Search/noticeable …   Wikipedia

  • noticeable — adj. VERBS ▪ be ▪ become ADVERB ▪ extremely, fairly, very, etc. ▪ especial …   Collocations dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.